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American Heart Month: Nearly Four Thousand Americans Waiting for Heart Transplants

Eva KrynovichFebruary is American Heart Month. It is likely that you know someone who has been affected by heart disease with more than two thousand Americans dying every day of cardiovascular disease. There are currently nearly four thousand Americans waiting for a lifesaving heart transplant, nearly 100 of which are in Colorado and Wyoming. Eva Krynovich of Colorado Springs used to be one of them until her lifesaving transplant in 2014.

After living with heart disease for more than 30 years—functioning fairly well with the help of a surgically implanted pacemaker, defibrillator and a regiment of medication—Eva’s heart began to fail rapidly in 2013. She became very sick and was in an out of the ER for heart failure almost every other week. Her doctor told her nothing more could be done and that she would need a heart transplant.

Eva was on the transplant list for four months, finally receiving her new heart on March 15, 2014. It has been more than three years since her transplant, and her life has changed dramatically.

“Every day is a gift. I am now able to do almost all of the activities that I did before I got sick. I look forward to many more years enjoying my family and watching my grandchildren grow.”Eva and Dan Krynovich

Eva was fortunate to have been given a second chance at life through organ donation, but many others are still waiting for that chance. This month, we urge Colorado and Wyoming residents to consider signing up to become organ, eye and tissue donors at the time of their death. It is quick and easy to say “yes” at the driver license office or Driver Services, or anytime at Donate Life Colorado or Donate Life Wyoming. Deciding to register as a deceased donor could help save the lives of patients waiting for heart transplants.

You can also read more and learn how to help prevent heart disease by visiting the American Heart Association.